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A Blog About FTC regulations and happenings

December 1, 2010

Not the Right Solution to Online Privacy Concerns

By: Ifrah Law
It has been widely reported that the Obama administration will soon announce a proposal designed to strengthen consumer privacy on the Internet. The plan, calling for new laws and a new “watchdog” position to oversee the effort, is expected to be part of an upcoming Commerce Department report. The concern about online privacy is well founded. Few consumers realize the extent to which their information is collected, bundled and sold to Internet marketers. Most websites employ tracking technologies that gather consumers’ search and spending habits to create detailed dossiers that are then sold to Internet marketers. And there is no comprehensive U.S. hotel comparison law that protects consumer privacy online. But we question whether a new law is needed. As the nation’s consumer protection agency, the Federal Trade Commission has been successfully prosecuting companies accused of violating consumer privacy both on and off the Internet for many years. The FTC’s mandate against deceptive and unfair practices is broad enough to encompass any conceivable... Read more

The Federal Trade Commission is taking steps to show that it is quite serious about enforcing the so-called blogger disclosure rules that it issued last year. The rules say, essentially, that when someone endorses or reviews a product or service, the person must disclose any relationship with the company that produces the product. So if… Read More

Is there a way to hold a government agency like the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) accountable for the cost to businesses of what a company says are abrupt and systemic changes in regulatory standards? POM Wonderful LLC, a Los Angeles-based juice company, is trying to do just that by suing the FTC in District Court…. Read More

Late last month, we noted a highly unusual decision by U.S. Magistrate Judge Alan Kay in the District of Columbia to order the Federal Trade Commission to respond to interrogatories about a subpoena it had issued to Paul Bisaro, the CEO of Watson Pharmaceuticals, in a generic-drug investigation. Normally, that sort of inquiry into the… Read More

When a U.S. magistrate judge in the District of Columbia issued his ruling in Federal Trade Commission v. Bisaro on July 13, 2010, permitting limited discovery of certain FTC officials regarding an agency subpoena, it had been more than three decades since the D.C. Circuit had found that “extraordinary circumstances” were present that warranted discovery… Read More

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