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A Blog About FTC regulations and happenings

The Federal Trade Commission is taking steps to show that it is quite serious about enforcing the so-called blogger disclosure rules that it issued last year. The rules say, essentially, that when someone endorses or reviews a product or service, the person must disclose any relationship with the company that produces the product. So if a blogger gets a free item from a manufacturer, the blogger has to say so in his or her review. The idea is that consumers would want to know if the objectivity of a review is tainted in any way. This type of problem occurs frequently in affiliate marketing, since the affiliates of a manufacturer can discuss the manufacturer’s products in their blogs. This would be a relationship that would have to be disclosed. But the rule isn’t limited to bloggers or affiliates. The commission just served notice that public relations and marketing firms are squarely in its focus. What if a PR firm’s employees are endorsing their clients’... Read more

Is there a way to hold a government agency like the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) accountable for the cost to businesses of what a company says are abrupt and systemic changes in regulatory standards? POM Wonderful LLC, a Los Angeles-based juice company, is trying to do just that by suing the FTC in District Court…. Read More

Late last month, we noted a highly unusual decision by U.S. Magistrate Judge Alan Kay in the District of Columbia to order the Federal Trade Commission to respond to interrogatories about a subpoena it had issued to Paul Bisaro, the CEO of Watson Pharmaceuticals, in a generic-drug investigation. Normally, that sort of inquiry into the… Read More

When a U.S. magistrate judge in the District of Columbia issued his ruling in Federal Trade Commission v. Bisaro on July 13, 2010, permitting limited discovery of certain FTC officials regarding an agency subpoena, it had been more than three decades since the D.C. Circuit had found that “extraordinary circumstances” were present that warranted discovery… Read More