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Crime in the Suites An Analysis of Current Issues in White Collar Defense
While the prosecution of former Senator Ted Stevens is long over, the fallout from the prosecutorial misconduct in that case continues. Congress is now considering legislation that attempts to ensure that federal prosecutors comply in a meaningful way with their obligations under Brady v. Maryland and its progeny. The legislation has some provisions that could possibly help protect Brady rights, but even if it passes – which appears doubtful – the bill is unfortunately more of a political gesture than an effective tool for protecting the rights of criminal defendants. Perhaps the most significant provision in the proposed Fairness in Disclosure Act is one that addresses the timing of Brady disclosures. Under current practice, prosecutors often delay the required disclosures of exculpatory information as long as possible. Given that the only time limitation appears to be the ill-defined requirement that information must be provided within a reasonable time for the defense to use it at trial, the law effectively allows the government to disclose Brady information almost any time before... Read more

On May 3, 2012, Ifrah Law filed an amicus curiae brief in the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of the Justice Fellowship and a group of law professors who practice in the areas of criminal law and sentencing. The brief was filed in the case of Rubashkin v. United States, a highly publicized case in… Read More

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April 26, 2012

U.N. Should Keep Its Hands Off the Internet

By: Ifrah Law

In March 2012, a resolution was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives that would urge the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations to oppose any resolution that would regulate the Internet. It is unfortunate that it turns out to be necessary to forestall Internet regulation at the U.N. level, but that appears to… Read More

Over the weekend, The New York Times broke a major story, publishing a highly detailed 8,000-word article that seems to indicate that Wal-Mart not only engaged in a pattern of bribery of Mexican government officials in the mid-2000s but also that the company intentionally stifled an internal investigation of the alleged bribery and in fact… Read More

One of the features of crimes committed over the Internet is that they may be committed from anywhere in the world where a defendant has access a computer. A current case in New York shows that extradition likewise can reach around the globe. On April 19, 2012, Anton Ivanov was extradited from Estonia to face… Read More

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April 20, 2012

An Interview With Jeff Ifrah of Ifrah Law

By: Jeff Ifrah

On April 15, 2012, the White Collar Crime Prof Blog ran an interview with Jeff Ifrah, founding partner of Ifrah Law. Here is the text of the interview, which can also be found here.     Q: Why did you start the blog? A: We wanted to share our analysis of breaking news in the… Read More

A Washington Post article today points out that in many cases over the past several decades, federal prosecutors knew that the evidence against a defendant was flawed because the science upon which the conviction had relied was not reliable – yet the prosecutors failed to notify the defendants or their attorneys of the problems. The… Read More

On April 4, the $25 billion national mortgage servicing settlement, which was announced in February, was finalized by a judge in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. The settlement with the nation’s five largest mortgage servicers — Bank of America Corporation, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Wells Fargo & Company, Citigroup Inc., and… Read More

What had been touted as a great victory for Google in particular and for “Internet freedom” in general was just dealt a major blow when the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court decision in Viacom’s lawsuit against Google and Google-owned YouTube. Viacom, along with the English… Read More

In recent weeks, Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) has criticized the Department of Justice’s handling of executives that some argue are responsible for the financial crisis. Sen. Grassley, the ranking minority member of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, held a hearing in February that looked at mortgage fraud, foreclosure abuse and lending discrimination practices. During… Read More

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