David S. Yellin

ASSOCIATE
Biography

Few associates have the exceptional combination of education, experience and accomplishment that David Yellin brings to Ifrah Law’s clients. With a strong expertise in federal procedure, David is known for his rigorous representation of individuals and companies embroiled in high stakes situations across a range of industries, from telecommunications and entertainment to financial services.

Since joining the firm, David has participated in all stages of complex litigation, defending clients in both civil and criminal cases: he has conducted discovery, trial and witness preparation, arbitrations and hearings before state and federal judges.

Some of his recent representative matters include:

  • Working with the Ifrah Law team to submit an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in Murphy v. NCAA, the pivotal sports betting case which was eventually decided in favor of our argument urging the rights of states to direct their own economies
  • Filing a RICO case which withstood a motion to dismiss against unethical plaintiffs’ attorneys who brought unfounded and extortive claims against our client, eventually reaching a satisfactory settlement of claims
  • Negotiating favorable sentences for individuals facing severe jail time for alleged crimes such as arms control violations and bribery
  • Drafting model legislation as part of a national trade association’s advocacy efforts promoting the rational regulation of online gaming in the U.S.
  • Defending a financial services company against claims under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”), litigating and arbitrating over 25 cases for this client in many jurisdictions across the United States and consistently negotiating satisfactory resolutions.

A magna cum laude graduate of Georgetown University Law Center with a Master of Science from the London School of Economics and Political Science, David also served as clerk to the Honorable Paul W. Grimm, District Judge for the United States District Court for the District of Maryland.

David began his legal career working side-by-side with a partner in the New York office of an AmLaw 100 litigation firm; he was involved with everything from motions practice to appellate work, to pro bono trials and administrative hearings.

David remains active in pro bono work focusing on human rights and asylum issues: he has volunteered at Dulles Justice Center in response to the Muslim Travel Ban, and with Human Rights First’s clinic where they help asylum seekers complete their asylum applications and prepare them to file pro se.

Publications + Presentations
November 2016 (updated January 2018) | Publication

"Gaming in the United States: New York: Overview"

Practical Law, Global Guides, Thomson Reuters

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Blog Posts
April 23, 2018

Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein to Make First Supreme Court Appearance in Sentencing Case, Even as Rumors Continue to Swirl of Potential Firing

Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein to Make First Supreme Court Appearance in Sentencing Case, Even as Rumors Continue to Swirl of Potential Firing

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will be arguing before the Supreme Court today for the first time in his nearly thirty-year government career even as rumors abound that Donald Trump is talking about firing him to cut off investigations into his administration’s Russia ties.   Although the United States is usually represented before the Supreme… Read More

November 28, 2017

CFTC Regulated Markets May Give Bitcoin the Stability It Needs

CFTC Regulated Markets May Give Bitcoin the Stability It Needs

The unregulated nature of virtual currencies like Bitcoin plays a big role in their appeal. However, wild swings in prices in addition to the perception that these markets are subject to manipulation, make it difficult—if not impossible—for the average person to rely heavily on Bitcoin and other virtual currencies as a currency, much less as… Read More

August 11, 2017

Supreme Court to Decide Whether Prosecutors Can Use Pleas to Skirt Constitution

Supreme Court to Decide Whether Prosecutors Can Use Pleas to Skirt Constitution

While the endless portrayal of jury trials in media might indicate otherwise, trials are actually quite rare in the U.S. criminal justice system. With 97% of federal cases ending in pleas, the Atticus Finch conception of American justice has been largely confined to books. Ordinarily, when an accused enters into a plea agreement, he waives… Read More

July 19, 2017

You Can’t Run From Justice

You Can’t Run From Justice

Just last week, a Kentucky lawyer by the name of Eric Conn was sentenced to twelve years in prison by a federal judge for bribery and theft of government money.  Though similar sentences are doled out around the country on a daily basis, this was unique because the defendant was not even in the courtroom. … Read More

June 12, 2017

The “Third Party” Catch-22

The “Third Party” Catch-22

As the Department of Justice has been doubling down on law enforcement overreach, the Supreme Court has just decided to hear a case that may limit the use of a common tool that law enforcement uses to infringe upon the privacy rights of innocent people. The case, Carpenter v. United States, arises out of a… Read More

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