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Collateral Damage: Criminal Convictions and the Lasting Consequences

Collateral Damage: Criminal Convictions and the Lasting Consequences

August 29, 2014

Collateral Damage: Criminal Convictions and the Lasting Consequences

By: Steven Eichorn

 

Prosecutors and often even judges do not appreciate the collateral consequences of a criminal conviction, regardless of whether it results from a trial or a plea agreement.  While the direct consequences of conviction are obvious – such as jail time, probation requirements, and fines – the collateral consequences are more insidious.  Yet sometimes those consequences can have an even greater impact on a person’s life than the sentence meted out by the court.  These consequences may be difficult to identify, though they may be mandated by statutes and regulations scattered throughout state and federal law, and may arise from a misdemeanor conviction, or even a simple arrest.

One of the most serious collateral consequences of a criminal conviction is its effect on a person’s immigration status, and thanks to the United States Supreme Court, it is now one that has great visibility for most defense counsel. In Padilla v. Kentucky (130 S. Ct. 1473 (2010)), the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Sixth Amendment’s guarantee of effective assistance of counsel requires that a defendant must be provided with notice of deportation consequences of a guilty plea he or she is considering.  This issue arises most frequently in the context of drug cases because of the draconian treatment of such conduct under U.S. law for non-citizens.  Since the Supreme Court’s opinion in Padilla, many courts now specifically include in their allocution during guilty pleas a specific notice regarding the possibility that a guilty plea may result in immigration consequences for the, including deportation, reversal of naturalization and non-admission.

But there are many other collateral consequences that are routine, but are not always referenced in a plea agreement and are often not recognized by defendants.   Under federal law, a person convicted of a felony may not possess a firearm – indeed, possession of a firearm by a felon constitutes a felony violation itself.  And many state laws require that defendants who commit sex crimes register with local authorities.   A conviction for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs may result in the administrative loss of driving privileges for a period of time.

There are even more serious collateral consequences that persist for long periods of time involving exclusion from employment prospects, eligibility for professional licensing and access to government benefits. For instance, employees in the nursing care industry are generally subject to background checks by their employer and are required to maintain certain licensing in their individual capacity as a condition to working in the industry. But even a relatively minor criminal conviction will raise a red flag on the background check and foil any chance of receiving a license. Similarly, a state agency may refuse to issue a business an operating license if some of its higher level employees have criminal convictions. Not only does this restriction limit a person’s employment prospects, but more broadly, they also harm the person’s chances of earning any livelihood because this person will also be prevented from owning any business that required such a state license.

For these reasons, it is absolutely essential that when considering whether to accept a plea agreement that both counsel and the client understand the consequences of the guilty plea in order to properly evaluate the benefits and the collateral damage of accepting a guilty plea versus proceeding to trial.  And it is essential that counsel advise their clients in an effective manner of the consequences of a conviction that may persist long after the clients leave the courthouse or the jail.

Steven Eichorn

Steven Eichorn

Steven Eichorn works with clients at the forefront of the technology, eCommerce, igaming and sports gambling industries. For both established companies and startups, Steven helps with licensing applications, legal opinions, buyouts and acquisitions, commercial agreements and ICOs, in addition to general legal matters like corporate formation documents, operation agreements and employee contracts.

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